Learn: in:
» back to Search Results

Course rating of 0 Vendor rating of 5


This seminar is a MUST for anyone who is involved in the selection, applications, or maintenance of electrical equipment. It covers how this equipment operates & provides guidelines & rules that must be followed for a successful operation.


 
Course Outline
Description Maximum efficiency, reliability, and longevity of electrical equipment such as the various types of motors, variable-speed drives, transformers, generators, rectifiers, inverters, uninterruptible power systems, circuit breakers, and fuses are of great concern to many industries. These objectives can only be achieved by understanding the characteristics, selection criteria, common problems and repair techniques, preventive and predictive maintenance. This seminar is a MUST for anyone who is involved in the selection, applications, or maintenance of electrical equipment. It provides the latest in technology. The seminar covers how this equipment operates and provides guidelines and rules that must be followed for a successful operation. Their basic design, operating characteristics, specification, selection criteria, advanced fault detection techniques, critical components as well as all maintenance issues are covered in detail.

Objectives
  • To provide a comprehensive understanding of the various types of motors, variable-speed drives, transformers, rectifiers and inverters, uninterruptable power systems (UPS), generators, circuit breakers, and fuses. Participants will be able to specify, select, commission and maintain this equipment for their applications.
  • To achieve reduced capital, operating and maintenance costs along with increase in efficiency.
Special Features Included in the seminar is a book titled "Electrical Equipment Handbook" (600 pages) published by McGraw-Hill in 2003 and a manual. Both the book and the manual are authored by the instructor.

Program Outline Faculty: Philip Kiameh, University of Toronto/Ontario Power Generation
 
1: Fundamentals of Electric Systems
  • 1.0 Capacitors
  • 2.0 Current and Resistance
  • 3.0 The Magnetic Field
    • 3.1  Ampère's Law
    • 3.2 Magnetic field in a solenoid
  • 4.0 Faraday's Law of Induction
  • 5.0 Lenz's Law
  • 6.0 Inductance
  • 7.0 Alternating Currents
  • 8.0 Three-Phase System
    • 8.1 Three-phase connections
    • 8.2 Power in three-phase systems
2: Introduction to Machinery Principles
  • 1.0  Electric Machines and Transformers
  • 2.0  Common Terms and Principles
  • 3.0  The Magnetic Field
    • 3.1  Production of a magnetic field
  • 4.0  Magnetic Behavior of Ferromagnetic Materials
    • 4.1  Energy losses in a ferromagnetic core
  • 5.0  Faraday's Law - Induced Voltage from a Magnetic Field Changing with Time
  • 6.0  Core Loss Values
  • 7.0  Permanent Magnets
  • 8.0  Production Of Induced Force on a Wire
  • 9.0  Induced Voltage on a Conductor Moving in a Magnetic Field
3: Transformers
  • 0.0  Importance of Transformers
  • 1.0  Types and Construction of Transformers
  • 2.0  The Ideal Transformer
    • 2.1  Power in an ideal transformer
  • 4.0  Impedance Transformation Through a Transformer
  • 5.0  Analysis of Circuits Containing Ideal Transformers
  • 6.0  Theory of Operation of Real Single-Phase Transformers
  • 7.0  The Voltage Ratio Across a Transformer
  • 8.0  The Magnetizing Current in a Real Transformer
  • 9.0  The Dot Convention
  • 10.0   The Equivalent Circuit of a Transformer
    • 10.1   Approximate equivalent circuits of a transformer
  • 11.0    The Transformer Voltage Regulation and Efficiency
    • 11.1    The transformer phasor diagram
    • 11.2      Simplified voltage regulation
    • 11.3     Transformer efficiency
    • 11.4    Transformer taps and voltage regulators
  • 12.0     The Autotransformer
  • 13.0     Three-Phase Transformers
    • 13.1    Three-phase transformer connections
  • 14.0   Transformer Ratings
    • 14.1     Voltage and frequency ratings of a transformer
    • 14.2     Apparent power rating of a transformer
    • 14.3     Inrush current
    • 14.4    Transformer nameplate
    • 14.5    Instrument transformers
4: Transformer Components and Maintenance
  • 1.0  Introduction
  • 2.0  Classification of Transformers
    • 2.1  Dry transformers
    • 2.2  Oil-immersed transformers
  • 3.0  Main Components of a Power Transformer
    • 3.1  Transformer core
    • 3.2  Windings
    • 3.3  Nitrogen demand system
    • 3.4  Conservative tank with air cell
    • 3.5  Current transformers
    • 3.6  Bushings
    • 3.7  Tap changers
    • 3.8  Insulation
  • 4.0  Types and Features of Insulation
    • 4.1  Reasons for deterioration
  • 5.0  Forces
  • 6.0  Cause of Transformer Failures
  • 7.0  Transformer Oil
    • 7.1  Testing transformer insulating oil
    • 7.2  Causes of deterioration
    • 7.3  The Neutralization Number Test
    • 7.4  The Interfacial Tension Test
    • 7.5  The Myers Index Number
    • 7.6  The Transformer Oil Classification System
    • 7.7  Methods of dealing with bad oil
    • 7.8 Gas-in-oil
  • 8.0  Gas Relay and Collection Systems
    • 8.1  Introduction
    • 8.2  Gas relay
  • 9.0 Relief Devices
  • 10.0 Interconnection with the Grid
5: AC Machine Fundamentals
  • 1.0  The Rotating Magnetic Field
    • 1.0  Proof of the rotating magnetic field flux concept
    • 1.1  The relationship between electrical frequency and the speed of magnetic field rotation
    • 1.2  Reversing the direction of the magnetic field rotation
  • 2.0  The Induced Voltage in AC Machines
    • 2.0  The induced voltage in a coil on a two-pole stator
    • 2.1  The induced voltage in a three-phase set of coils
    • 2.3  The RMS voltage in a three-phase stator
  • 3.0  The Induced Torque in a Three-Phase Machine
  • 4.0  Winding Insulation in AC Machines
  • 5.0  AC Machine Power Flow and Losses
6: Induction Motors
  • 1.0  Induction Motor Construction
  • 2.0  Basic Induction Motor Concepts
    • 2.1  The concept of rotor slip
    • 2.2  The electrical frequency of the rotor
  • 3.0  The Equivalent Circuit of an Induction Motor
    • 3.1  The rotor circuit model
  • 4.0  Losses and The Power-Flow Diagram
  • 5.0  Induction Motor Torque-Speed Characteristics
    • 5.1  Comments on the induction motor torque-speed curve
    • 5.2  Variation of the torque-speed characteristics
  • 6.0  Control of Motor Characteristics By Squirrel-Cage Rotor Design
    • 6.1  Deep bar and double-cage rotor designs
  • 7.0  Starting Induction Motors
    • 7.1  Induction motor starting circuits
7: Speed Control of Induction Motors
  • 1.0  Speed Control by Changing the Line Frequency
  • 2.0 Speed Control by Changing the Line Voltage
  • 3.0 Speed Control by Changing the Rotor Resistance
  • 4.0 Solid-State Induction Motor Drives
  • 5.0 Motor Protection
  • 6.0 The Induction Generator
    • 1.1  Induction generator operating alone
  • 7.0 Induction Motor Ratings
8: Maintenance of Motors
  • 1.0  Characteristics of Motors
  • 2.0  Enclosures and Cooling Methods
  • 3.0  Application Data
  • 4.0  Design Characteristics
  • 5.0  Insulation of AC Motors
  • 6.0  Failures in Three-Phase Stator Windings
  • 7.0  Predictive Maintenance
  • 8.0  Motor Troubleshooting
  • 9.0  Diagnostic Testing for Motors
    • 9.1  Stator insulation tests
    • 9.2  DC tests for stator and rotor windings
    • 9.3  Insulation and polarization index
    • 9.4  Test setup and performance
    • 9.5  Interpretation
    • 9.6  DC High-Potential (Hipot) testing
    • 9.7  Surge testing
    • 9.8  Terminal-to-terminal resistances (winding resistances)
    • 9.9  Tests for the detection of open circuits in induction motor cage windings
    • 9.10    Stator Current Fluctuation Test
    • 9.11      Manual Rotation Test
  • 10.0     Repair and Refurbishment of AC Induction Motors
    • 10.1   Stator work
    • 10.2    Rotor work
    • 10.3     Bearings
    • 10.4    Oil and water heat exchangers
    • 10.5     Temperature detectors
    • 10.6     Motor repair
    • 10.7     Motor rewind
  • 11.0    Failures in Three-Phase Stator Windings
9: Power Electronics, Rectifiers and Pulse-Width Modulation Inverters
  • 1.0  Introduction to Power Electronics
  • 2.0 Power Electronics Components
    • 2.1  Diode
    • 2.2  The two-wire thyristor or PNPN diode
    • 2.3  The three-wire thyristor or SCR
    • 2.4  The gate turn-off thyristor
    • 2.5  The DIAC
    • 2.6  The TRIAC
    • 2.7  The power transistor
    • 2.8  The Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT)
  • 3.0  Power and Speed Comparison of Power Electronic Components
  • 4.0  Basic Rectifier Circuits
    • 4.1 The half-wave rectifier
    • 4.2 The full-wave rectifier
    • 4.3 The three-phase half wave rectifier
    • 4.4 The three-phase full wave rectifier
  • 5.0  Filtering Rectifier Output
  • 6.0  Pulse Circuits
  • 7.0  A Relaxation Oscillator Using a PNPN Diode
  • 8.0  Pulse Synchronization
  • 9.0  Voltage Variation By AC Phase Control
    • 9.1  AC phase control for a DC load driven from an AC source
    • 9.2  AC phase control for an AC load
  • 10.0   The Effect of Inductive Loads on Phase Angle Control
  • 11.0    Inverters
    • 11.1  The rectifier
    • 11.2     External commutation inverters
    • 11.3     Self-commutated inverters
    • 11.4      Pulse-width modulation inverters
10: Variable Speed Drives
  • 1.0  Basic Principles of AC Variable Speed Drivers (VSD'S)
    • 1.1  Constant torque region
    • 1.2  Constant power (extended speed) region
  • 2.0  Inverters
    • 2.1  Parts of an Inverter
    • 2.2 Pulse-Width Modulated (PWM) Inverters
      • 2.2.2 Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT'S)
      • 2.2.3 2-Level Width Modulated Inverter (PMW-2)
  • 3.0 Input Power Converter (rectifier)
  • 4.0  DC link Energy
  • 5.0  Output IGBT Inverter
  • 6.0  Input Sources for Regeneration or Dynamic Slowdown
    • 6.1  Dynamic breaking
  • 7.0  Regeneration
  • 8.0  PWM-2 Considerations
  • 9.0  Transients, Harmonics Power Factor and Failures
    • 9.1  Semiconductor failure rate
    • 9.2  Common failure modes
      • 9.2.1 Differential expansion
      • 9.2.2 Fault current limit
      • 9.2.3 Device explosion rating
      • 9.2.4 Device application
  • 10.0   Thyristor Failures and Testing
    • 10.1 Recognizing failed SCR/Diode
    • 10.2   Testing SCR's/Diodes
    • 10.3    Comments about failures and rates
  • 11.0    AC Drive Application Issues
    • 11.1    Introduction
    • 11.2    Diode source current unbalance
  • 12.0    AC Power Factor
    • 12.1    AC input power changes with AC input voltage
  • 13.0   IGBT Switching Transients
    • 13.1    Insulation voltage stress
    • 13.2     Motor winding voltage distribution
    • 13.3     Radiated Electromagnetic Interferences (EMI)
    • 13.4     Cable terminating (matching) impendance
    • 13.5     Inverter output filter
    • 13.6      Extra insulation
  • 14.0   Cabling Details For AC Drives
  • 15.0   Cable Details
    • 15.1  Motor, cable, and power system grounding
  • 16.0    Motor Bearing Currents
    • 16.1   Add a motor shaft grounding brush
    • 16.2    Reduce the stator to rotor capacitance value
    • 16.3    Use conductive grease in motor bearings
    • 16.4     Motor cable wiring practices
  • 17.0     Summary of Application Rules For AC Drives
  • 18.0     Selection Criteria of VSD's
    • 18.1    Variable process speed
    • 18.2     Compressors and pumps
    • 18.3    Motor starting
  • 19.0   Regeneration
    • 19.1    Dynamometer
    • 19.2    Paper machine winder
    • 19.3    Dynamic breaking
  • 20.0    Maintenance
  • 21.0    Common Failure Modes
  • 22.0    Motor Application Guidelines
11: Uninterruptible Power Systems (UPS's)
  • 1.0  Introduction
  • 2.0  UPS Operation
  • 3.0  Mission Time
  • 4.0  Standards
  • 5.0  Voltage Regulation
  • 6.0  Harmonic Distortion
  • 7.0  Soft-Start
  • 8.0  Overload Rating
  • 9.0  Advanced UPS Design
  • 10.0   Output Contactor
  • 11.0   Battery Protection
  • 12.0    Efficiency
  • 13.0    Power Factor Derating
  • 14.0    Environmental Conditions
  • 15.0     Input Power Converter
  • 16.0  Inverter
  • 17.0    Static Bypass
  • 18.0   Display and Controls
  • 19.0   Battery Disconnect Breaker
  • 20.0    Battery System
  • 21.0   Maintenance Bypass Cabinet (MBC)
  • 22.0   Intersystem Synchronization
  • 23.0   Parallel Operation
  • 24.0    Unattended Shutdown
  • 25.0    Remote UPS Monitoring
  • 26.0     Software Compatibility
  • 27.0    Factory Inspection
  • 28.0    Testing of UPS
    • 28.1   Steady-state performance tests
    • 28.2   Dynamic performance tests
    • 28.3    Isolation tests
    • 28.4     Reliability tests
  • 29.0    Commissioning of UPS
  • 30.0     Maintenance Contracts
  • 31.0      UPS Maintenance
  • 32.0     Battery Maintenance
  • 33.0    UPS Sizing
  • 34.0    Battery Sizing
  • 35.0     Battery Selection
  • 36.0    Space Vector Modulation Technology
  • 37.0    Electromagnetic and Radio Frequency Interference 
12: Maintenance of Industrial Batteries
  • 1.0  Introduction
  • 2.0  Definitions
  • 3.0  Discharge Voltage Characteristics
  • 4.0  Battery Life
  • 5.0  Battery Types
  • 6.0  Lead-Acid Batteries
  • 7.0  Installation and Operation
  • 8.0  Placing the Battery in Service
  • 9.0  Charging the Battery
  • 10.0  Modified Constant-Voltage Method
  • 11.0    Taper Method
  • 12.0   Two - Rate method
  • 13.0  Constant-Current Method
  • 14.0    Maintenance
  • 15.0  Prevention of Over-Discharging
  • 16.0   Determination of Battery Condition
  • 17.0   Troubleshooting
  • 18.0   Repairs and Maintenance of Batteries
13: Synchronous Machines
  • 1.0  Physical Description
  • 2.0  Pole Pitch: Electrical Degrees
  • 3.0  Airgap and Magnetic Circuit of a Synchronous Machine
  • 4.0  Synchronous Machine Windings
  • 5.0  Field Excitation
    • 5.1  Rotating rectifier excitation
    • 5.2  Series excitation
  • 6.0  No-Load and Short-Circuit Values
  • 7.0  Torque Tests
    • 7.1  Speed-torque characteristic
    • 7.2  Pull-in torque
    • 7.3  Pull-out torque
  • 8.0  Excitation of a Synchronous Machine
  • 9.0  Machine Losses
    • 9.1  Windage and friction loss
    • 9.2  Core losses
    • 9.3  Stray-load loss
    • 9.4  Armature conductor loss
    • 9.5  Excitation loss 
14: Synchronous Generators
  • 1.0 Synchronous Generator Construction
  • 2.0 The Speed of Rotation of A Synchronous Generator
  • 3.0  The Internal Generated Voltage of a Synchronous Generator
  • 4.0  The Equivalent Circuit of a Synchronous Generator
  • 5.0  The Phasor Diagram of a Synchronous Generator
  • 6.0  Power and Torque in Synchronous Generators
  • 7.0  The Synchronous Generator Operating Alone
    • 7.1  The effect of load change on a synchronous generator operating alone
  • 8.0  Parallel Operation of AC Generators
    • 8.1  The conditions required for paralleling
    • 8.2  The general procedure for paralleling generators
    • 8.3  Frequency-power and voltage-reactive power characteristics of a synchronous generator
  • 9.0  Operation of Generators in Parallel With Large Power Systems
  • 10.0   Synchronous Generator Ratings
    • 10.1  The voltage, speed, and frequency ratings
    • 10.2   Apparent power and power-factor ratings
  • 11.0   Synchronous Generator Capability Curves
  • 12.0    Short-Time Operation and Service Factor 
15: Generator Components, Auxiliaries and Excitation
  • 1.0  Introduction
  • 2.0  The Rotor
    • 2.1  Rotor winding
    • 2.2  Rotor end rings
    • 2.3  Wedges and dampers
    • 2.4  Sliprings, brushgear and shaft grounding
    • 2.5  Fans
    • 2.6  Rotor and threading alignment
    • 2.7  Vibration
    • 2.8  Bearings and seals
    • 2.9  Size and weight
  • 3.0  Turbine-Generator Components: The Stator
    • 3.1  Stator core
    • 3.2  Core frame
    • 3.3  Stator winding
    • 3.4  End winding support
    • 3.5  Electrical connections and terminals
    • 3.6  Stator winding cooling components
    • 3.7  Hydrogen cooling components
    • 3.8  Stator casing
  • 4.0  Cooling Systems
    • 4.1  Hydrogen cooling
    • 4.2  Hydrogen cooling systems
  • 5.0  Shaft Seals and Seal Oil Systems
    • 5.1  Thrust type seal
    • 5.2  Journal type seal
    • 5.3  Seal oil system
  • 6.0  Stator Winding Water Cooling Systems
  • 7.0  Other Cooling Systems
  • 8.0  Excitation
    • 8.1  AC excitation systems
    • 8.2  Exciter transient performance
    • 8.3  The pilot exciter
    • 8.4  The main exciter
    • 8.5  Exciter performance testing
    • 8.6  Pilot exciter protection
    • 8.7  Brushless excitation systems
    • 8.8  The rotating armature main exciter
  • 9.0  The Voltage Regulator
    • 9.1  Background
    • 9.2  System description
    • 9.3  The regulator
    • 9.4  Auto follow-up circuit
    • 9.5  Manual follow-up
    • 9.6  AVR protection
    • 9.7  The digital AVR
    • 9.8  Excitation control
    • 9.9  Rotor current limiter
    • 9.10 Overfluxing limit
  • 10.0 The Power System Stabilizer
  • 11.0 Characteristics of Generator Exciter Power Systems (GEP)
    • 11.1  Excitation system analysis
  • 12.0  Generator Operation
    • 12.1  Running-up to speed
    • 12.2  Open circuit conditions and synchronizing
    • 12.3  The application of a load
    • 12.4  Capability chart
    • 12.5  Neutral grounding
    • 12.6  Rotor torque
16: Generator Main Connections
  • 1.0  Introduction
  • 2.0  Isolated Phase Bus Bar Circulatory Currents
  • 3.0  System Description
17: Double-Feed Generators
  • 1.0  Introduction
  • 2.0  Basic System Configuration
  • 3.0  Equivalent Circuit for the Brushless Double-fed Machine
  • 4.0  Parameter Extraction
  • 5.0  Generator Operation
  • 6.0  Converter Rating
  • 7.0  Machine Control
  • 8.0  Conclusions
18: Performance and Operation of Generators
  • 1.0  Generator Systems
    • 1.1  Excitation
    • 1.2  Hydrogen cooling
    • 1.3  Cooling of the stator conductors
    • 1.4  Hydrogen seals
  • 2.0  Condition Monitoring
    • 2.2 Temperature monitoring - thermocouples
    • 2.4  Hydrogen gas analysis
    • 2.5  Hydrogen dew point monitoring and control
    • 2.6  Vibration monitoring
  • 3.0  Operational Limitations
    • 3.1  Temperatures
    • 3.2  Hydrogen leakage
  • 4.0  Fault Conditions
    • 4.1  Stator ground (earth) faults
    • 4.2  Stator phase-to-phase faults
    • 4.3  Stator interturn faults
    • 4.4  Negative phase sequence currents
    • 4.5  Loss of generator excitation
    • 4.6  Pole slipping
    • 4.7  Rotor faults
19: Generator Surveillance and Testing
  • 1.0  Generator Operational Checks (Surveillance and Monitoring)
    • 1.1  Major overhaul (every 8-10 years)
  • 2.0  Generator Diagnostic Testing
    • 2.1  Introduction
    • 2.2  Stator insulation tests
    • 2.3  DC tests for stator and rotor windings index
  • 3.0 Insulation Resistance and Polarization Index
    • 3.1 Test setup and performance
    • 3.2 Interpretation
  • 4.0 DC Hipot Test
    • 4.1  High voltage and step ramp tests
  • 5.0  AC Tests for Stator Windings
    • 5.1  Dissipation factor and Tip-Up Tests
      • 5.1.1 Tip-Up Test
      • 5.1.2 Stator Turn Insulation Surge Test
  • 6.0  Synchronous Machine Rotor Windings
    • 6.1  Open Circuit Test for shorted turns
    • 6.2  Air gap search coil for detecting turns
    • 6.3  Impedance Test with rotor installed
    • 6.4  Detecting the location of shorted turns with rotor removed
      • 6.4.1 Low voltage AC Test
      • 6.4.2 Low voltage DC Test (Voltage-Drop Test)
      • 6.4.3 Field winding ground fault detectors
      • 6.4.4 Surge testing for rotor shorted turns and ground faults
  • 7.0  Partial Discharge Tests
    • 7.0  Off-line conventional pd test
      • 7.0.1 Test setup and performance
      • 7.0.2 Interpretation
    • 7.1  On-Line conventional pd test
  • 8.0  Low Core Flux Test (EL-CID)
  • 9.0  Mechanical Tests
  • 9.0  Introduction
    • 9.1  Stator windings tightness check
    • 9.2  Stator winding side clearance check
    • 9.3  Core laminations tightness check (knife test)
    • 9.4  Visual techniques
  • 10.0  Groundwall Insulation
  • 11.0  Rotor Winding
  • 12.0  Turn Insulation
  • 13.0  Slow Wedges and Bracing
  • 14.0  Stator and Rotor Cores 
20: Generator Inspection and Maintenance
  • 1.0  On-Load Maintenance and Monitoring
    • 1.1  Stator
    • 1.2  Rotor
    • 1.3  Excitation system
  • 2.0  Off-Load Maintenance
    • 2.1  Stator internal work
    • 2.2  Stator external work
    • 2.3  Rotor
    • 2.4  Slip rigs and brush gear
    • 2.5  Exciter and pilot exciter
    • 2.6  Rectifier
    • 2.7  Field switch
    • 2.8  Automatic voltage regulator
    • 2.9  Supervisory and protection equipment
  • 3.0  Generator Testing
    • 3.1  Insulation testing
    • 3.2  Testing the stator core
    • 3.3  Stator coolant circuit testing
    • 3.4  Hydrogen Loss Test
    • 3.5  Rotor Winding Tests 
21: Generator Operational Problems and Refurbishment Options
  • 1.0  Typical Generator Operational Problems
    • 1.1  Shorted turns and field grounds
    • 1.2  Thermal sensitivity
    • 1.3  Contamination
    • 1.4  Collector, bore copper and connection problems
      • 1.4.1  Copper distortion
    • 1.5  Forging concerns
    • 1.6  Retaining rings
    • 1.7  Misoperation
  • 2.0  Generator Rotor Reliability and Life Expectancy
    • 2.1  Generator experience
  • 3.0  Generator Rotor Refurbishment
    • 3.1  Generator rotor rewind
  • 4.0  Types of Insulation
  • 5.0  Generator Rotor Modifications, Upgrades and Uprates
  • 6.0  High Speed Balancing
  • 7.0  Flux Probe Test
22: Circuit Breakers
  • 1.0  Theory of Circuit Interruption
    • 1.1 Introduction
  • 2.0 Physics of Arc Phenomena
    • 2.1  Arc interruption theory
    • 2.2  High resistance interruption
    • 2.3  Low resistance or current zero interruption
  • 3.0 Circuit Breaker Rating
  • 4.0 Conventional Circuit Breakers
    • 4.1 Automatic switch
    • 4.2 Air-break circuit breakers
  • 5.0 Methods for Increasing Arc Resistance
  • 6.0 Plain Break Type
  • 7.0 Magnetic Blow-out Type
  • 8.0  Arc Splitter Type
  • 9.0  Application
  • 10.0 Oil Circuit Breakers
    • 10.1 Advantages of oil
    • 10.2 Disadvantages of oil circuit breakers
    • 10.3 Plain break oil circuit breaker
    • 10.4 Arc control circuit breakers
  • 11.0 Recent Developments in Circuit Breakers
    • 11.1  Vacuum circuit breakers
      • 11.1.1  Construction of vacuum switch/circuit breakers
      • 11.1.2  Vacuum chamber
      • 11.1.3  Application of vacuum switches
    • 11.2  Sulphur Hexafluoride (SF6) Circuit Breakers
    • 11.2.1  Maintenance of SF6 breakers
      • 11.2.1.1 Storage
      • 11.2.1.2 Description
      • 11.2.1.3 Pole characteristics
      • 11.2.1.4 Maintenance
      • 11.2.1.5 Maintenance program
      • 11.2.1.6 General inspection of the circuit breaker
      • 11.2.1.7 Lubrication
23: Fuses
  • 1.0  Types of Fuses
    • 1.1  Single-element fuses
    • 1.2  Dual-element fuses
    • 1.3  Current limiting fuses
  • 2.0  Features of Current Limiting Fuses
  • 3.0  Advantages of Fuses Over Circuit Breakers
24: Bearings and Lubrication
  • 1.0  Types of Bearings
    • 1.1  Ball and roller bearings
    • 1.2  Stresses during rolling contact
  • 2.0  Statistical Nature of Bearing Life
  • 3.0  Materials and Finish
  • 4.0 Sizes of Bearings
  • 5.0 Types of Roller Bearings
  • 6.0 Thrust Bearings
  • 7.0 Lubrication
    • 7.1 The viscosity of lubricants
      • 7.1.1 Viscosity units
      • 7.1.2 Significance of viscosity
      • 7.1.3 Flow through pipes
      • 7.1.4 Variation of viscosity with temperature and pressure
        • 7.1.4.1 Temperature effect
        • 7.1.4.2 Viscosity Index
        • 7.1.4.3 Effects of pressure on viscosity
    • 7.2 Non-Newtonian Fluids
      • 7.2.1 Greases
    • 7.3 VI Improved Oils
    • 7.4 Oils at low temperatures
    • 7.5 Variation of lubricant viscosity with use
      • 7.5.1 Oxidation reactions
      • 7.5.2 Physical reactions
    • 7.6 Housing and lubrication
      • 7.6.1 Lubrication and antifriction bearings 
25: Used Oil Analysis
  • 1.0  Proper Lube Oil Sampling Technique
  • 2.0  Test Description and Significance
    • 2.1 Visual and Sensory Inspection
    • 2.2  Chemical and Physical Tests
      • 2.2.1 Water content
      • 2.2.2 Viscosity
      • 2.2.3 Emission spectrographic analysis
      • 2.2.4 Infrared analysis
      • 2.2.5 Total base number
      • 2.2.6 Total acid number
      • 2.2.7 Particle count
  • 2.3  Summary
26: Vibration Analysis
  • 1.0  The Application of Sine Waves to Vibration
  • 2.0  Multimass Systems
  • 3.0  Resonance
  • 4.0  Logarithms and Decibels (db)
  • 5.0  The Use of Filtering
  • 6.0  Vibration Instrumentation
    • 6.1  Displacement transducer (proximity probe)
    • 6.2  Velocity transducer
    • 6.3  Acceleration transducer
    • 6.4  Transducer selection
  • 7.0  Time Domain
  • 8.0  Frequency Domain
  • 9.0  Machinery Example
  • 10.0  Vibration Analysis
    • 10.1   Vibration causes
    • 10.2   Forcing frequency causes
    • 10.3    Unbalance
    • 10.4    Misalignment
    • 10.5     Mechanical looseness
    • 10.6    Bearing defects
    • 10.7    Gear defects
    • 10.8    Oil whirl
    • 10.9     Blade or vane problems
    • 10.10   Electric motor defects
    • 10.11  Uneven loading
    • 10.12  Drive-shaft torsion
  • 11.0   Resonant Frequency
  • 12.0    Vibration Severity
27: Power Station Electrical Systems and Design Requirements
  • 1.0  Introduction
  • 2.0  System Requirements
    • 2.1  Grid criteria
    • 2.2  Safety requirements
  • 3.0  Electrical System Description
    • 3.1  The generator main output system
    • 3.2  Electrical auxiliary systems
    • 3.3  Type of stations
  • 4.0  System Performance
    • 4.1  Unit start-up
    • 4.2  Plant requirements
    • 4.3  Synchronizing to the grid
    • 4.4  Synchronizing the unit to the station
    • 4.5  Shutdown and power trip
    • 4.6  Controlled shutdown
    • 4.7  Power trip
    • 4.8  The effects of loss of grid supplies
  • 5.0  Power Plant Outages and Faults
  • 6.0  Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) Systems
    • 6.1 Introduction
  • 7.0  DC Systems
    • 7.1  Introduction
    • 7.2  DC system functions
    • 7.3  Mission time of DC systems
28: Power Station Protective Systems
  • 1.0  Introduction
  • 2.0  Design Criteria
  • 3.0  Generator Protection
    • 3.1  Stator ground (earth) faults - low impedance grounding
    • 3.2  Stator ground faults - high resistance grounding
    • 3.3  Stator phase-to-phase faults
  • 4.0  DC Tripping Systems
    • 4.1  Logic diagram
29: Frequently Asked Questions
  • 1.0  Fundamentals of Electric Systems
  • 2.0  Introduction to Machinery Principles
  • 3.0  Transformers
  • 4.0  Transformer Components and Maintenance
  • 5.0  Interconnection With the Grid
  • 6.0  AC Machine Fundamentals
  • 7.0  Induction Motors
  • 8.0  Speed Control of Induction Motors
  • 9.0  Maintenance of Motors
  • 10.0   Variable Speed Drives
  • 11.0  Synchronous Generators
  • 12.0  Generator Components, Auxiliaries, and Excitation
There will be a one-hour lunch break each day in addition to refreshment and networking breaks during the morning and afternoon.? Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

After Participating in this Course, You will be Able to:

  • Select out of the various types of transformers, motors, variable speed drives, rectifiers, inverters, uninterruptable power systems (UPS), generators, circuit breakers, and fuses that are more suitable for your application
  • Use diagnostic testing, inspect with the awareness of common failure modes, apply advanced fault detection techniques, and recognize critical components that need more frequent attention.
  • Save cost by enhancing reliability through predictive and preventive maintenance
  • Increase availability of your equipment by appropriate commissioning using the understanding of commissioning requirements gained at the course
  • Apply the new maintenance skills learnt at the course to minimize the operating cost and maximize efficiency, reliability and longevity
Daily Schedule (Day 1 to 5):

8:00 Registration and Coffee (1st day only)
8:30 Session begins
4:30 Adjournment
Prerequisites & Certificates
Pre-Requisites

Who Should Attend Power plant electrical and mechanical engineers, consulting engineers, electrical and mechanical technicians and technologists, project engineers, power plant managers, Outage managers, technical sales managers, senior electricians and other technical personnel interested in power plant equipment.

Certificates offered


Cancellation Policy
To withdraw from a course, you must send a request, in writing, with the official receipt to our office. Fifteen or more business days in advance: full refund less $50.00 administration charge. Five to fifteen business days in advance: non-refundable credit of equal value for any future EPIC seminar within one year. Credits are transferable within your organization. In case of an unexpected event occurring after this time, you may send someone else to take your place without any additional cost.
Map & Reviews
EPIC Educational Program Innovations Center
[ View Provider's Profile ]

Reviews
 

This course has not yet been rated by one of our members.

If you have taken a course through this vendor please log into your account and leave feedback for this vendor. You will be helping ensure our members get directed to the best training facilities.

Here are some reviews of the training vendor.
The course was very well presented and the course instructor was absolutely amazing.
Reviewed by 2013
Our instructor, Stephen Lamming, was outstanding and a true expert in his field. He was able to complement the technical air monitoring information with practical real life examples which was highly beneficial. He is an excellent communicator and was highly interactive with the course attendees. This course was recommended to me because Stephen Lamming does an outstanding job. I was very impressed with this course and have subsequently recommended it to my colleagues.
Reviewed by 2012
Would have liked more interactive problem solving.
Reviewed by 2011
need-to-train-a-group-banner

This course currently does not have any dates scheduled. Please call 1-877-313-8881 to enquire about future dates or scheduling a private, in house course for your team.

This page has been viewed 291 times.